Blog

  • Everything You Need to Know About Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Your brachial plexus is a network of nerves in your shoulder that branches into five major nerves in each arm. It carries signals from your spinal cord to your arms and hands, allowing you to move your arm, hands, and wrists. Sensory skin nerves are also part of the brachial plexus and allow you to feel temperature and other sensations. There are several types of brachial plexus injuries, with many different causes. They also vary in severity, with some people healing completely on their own and others having permanent damage.

    Read more

  • Tennis Elbow: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

    Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is swelling, inflammation, and subsequent tearing of the tendons in your forearm.These tissues, which attach muscle to bone, can become overtaxed with repetitive use, causing an aching or burning pain that gets worse when you grip or lift something.

    Read more

  • What Is Haglund's Deformity?

    Haglund's deformity is a bony bump where your Achilles tendon attaches at the back of your heel bone. Because of its prominence, the bump is subject to the effects of constant friction. This causes redness and irritation, and can cause skin thickening, pain, swelling, and increased skin lines.

    Read more

  • Exercise can modify fat tissue in ways that improve health—even without weight loss

    Exercise is one of the first strategies used to treat obesity-related health problems like type 2 diabetes and other cardiovascular disease, but scientists don't understand exactly how it works to improve metabolic health. To that end, University of Michigan researchers examined the effects of three months of exercise on people with obesity, and found that exercise can favorably modify abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, the fat tissue just beneath the skin, in ways that can improve metabolic health—even without weight loss.

    Read more

  • Sport improves concentration and quality of life

    Physically fit primary school pupils feel better and can concentrate better. They are more likely to make it to higher-level secondary grammar schools than children with less sporting abilities. This has been confirmed for the first time in a study by the Department of Sport and Health Sciences at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).

    Read more

Pages [1] 2 3 4 5 6 of 31 | Next | Last